Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Academic Articles for Grant Writing



Annotated Bibliography
Academic Articles of Grant Writing

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: (1) “writing grants” and “school library”
Article:
Ellis, L. (2015, February). We can’t do it alone. Teacher Librarian. 42(3), 18-21.
Explanation: With the partnership of public libraries and school libraries, New York City has been able to increase teacher and student access to millions of high-quality informational resources. In addition to students having access to resources, teachers now have special educator privileges, allowing teachers more opportunities to plan ahead of time, access to new materials and resources, and the ability to prepare students for college readiness and the rigors of college-level work without having to take additional courses. School library professionals are the backbone of helping students think critically about information through evaluating arguments, critical textual evidence, synthesizing disparate points of view, and more.
Abstract from Engine Orange: The article discusses the importance of district level advocacy and professional support in the continued practice of teacher librarians. Topics include the New York City School Library System (NYCSLS) offerings to teacher librarians, the importance of strong educational leadership as exemplified by Barbara Tremblay of the P721K in South Brooklyn in New York City, New York, and the partnerships between New York City's public library systems and the New York City Department of Education.

 
Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: (2) “writing grants” and “school library” and “money”
Article:
Maxwell, N. K., & American Library Association. (2014). The ALA Book of Library Grant
Money: Vol. Ninth edition. ALA Editions. Retrieved from Engine Orange.
Explanation: This book aims to provide librarians, fundraisers, and researchers with quick, convenient access to information on the major US funding sources for library grants including private and corporate foundations, corporate direct givers, library and nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. Maxwell and ALA insist that one should use all of their available resources to aid oneself in writing grants and receiving development assistance through the process.
Description from Engine Orange: This all-in-one resource for researching library and school grants is back in a new edition, and more useful than ever, offering refreshed content and even more guidance on locating grant funding sources. Using this guide, librarians, fundraisers, and researchers will find quick, convenient access to information on the most likely funding sources for libraries, including private foundations, corporate foundations, corporate direct givers, government agencies, and library and nonprofit organizations. Edited by Nancy Kalikow Maxwell, a grant writer with 35 years of experience, this edition includes more than 200 new entries, as well as a detailed introduction explaining the concept of “grant readiness” and walking readers through the steps of preparing their institution for a grant project, including strategic planning, conducting a needs assessment, and identifying potential partners, guidance on the most effective ways to use the directory, with an explanation of inclusion criteria and data elements, multiple indexes for finding the right information fast. A new section covering grant-related organizations and sources, to aid readers looking for grant writers or grant development assistance. The challenge of “finding the money” will be made easier with this guide's clear and comprehensive information.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: (3) “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Baxter, V. (2007, October). Library media advocacy through grant writing. School Library
Media Activities Monthly. 24(2), 45-48.
Explanation:  Baxter describes the individuals that are available to help you write a grant, hinting that some forms can be over twenty pages long, and how you can be successful in choosing the right person/group to help you. Baxter also mentions how the action plan is the most important part of the grant-writing process because it allows you to fill in the required information for submission while informing others of your broad goals and accompanying objectives that you wish to complete in the upcoming year. One of the most user friendly parts of the article is a visual of an action plan, including goals, objectives, and an easy to understand set up of who to contact, when to contact them, resources requested, progress of the requested materials, and who gathered them.
No abstract was given.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Carpenter, J. (2008). Library project funding: a guide to planning and writing proposals.
Oxford: Chandos Publishing.
Explanation: Library staff members and managers of information services are required to prepare, more times than not, a project proposal and bid for funding. The projects proposed and requested must be feasible, realistic, and thoroughly thought through for external funding to occur. Through the use of project development, action plans, planning and preparation for bids, developing a proposal, and promoting it to funders, one can acquire the funds needed for the fulfillment of their grant.
Abstract from Engine Orange: This title provides guidance on the various steps involved in project development, planning and the preparation of bids for funding based on the author's own experience and that of many organizations in the cultural heritage and education sectors.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Gerding, S. (2006, September/October). Writing successful library grant proposals. Public
Libraries: Bringing in the Money. 45(5), 31-33. 
Explanation: The most important part of grant work is the planning phase, per Gerding, because no good grant is just an idea or announcement. Once a mission and plan are concocted, one must go through with writing the proposal which is judged on content and not the amount that one writes. While some grant proposals are quite lengthy, Gerding insits that one should be convincing, persuasive, but truthful in the reasoning for your requests. A few key points Gerding explained were to know your audience and who you are requesting funds from, the different parts of a proposal, the application summary (should always be written last), organizing an overview, your statement of needs that will prove that the grant will solve the problem, the description of the grant, the budget in a detailed allocation form, and the evaluation process of the outcome of your grant.
No abstract was given.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Gerding, S. & MacKellar, P. (2006, July/August). Wishing won’t work: 10 things you need to
know and do when applying for technology grants. Computers in Libraries. 26(7), 6-8,
56-60.
Explanation: Gerding and MacKellar break down the ten most important things one needs to know when applying specifically for technology grants. The following are the top ten: (1) be the vest library for your community, (2) funders like technology plans and some even require them, (3) create a team to develop the project with library staff members and others interested in technology and tech-savvy individuals, (4) form partnerships with other groups in your area that allow you to share costs and build a community network, (5) find resources that fit your needs focusing on either a public, government or private grant, (6) understand current technology funding trends, (7) justify the value of technology, (8) get tips from success stories and other examples, (9) apply for grants despite your misconceptions, and (10) follow through with the idea that you know your community’s needs, are able to identify the problem and envision a solution, focus on the project itself and not the technology, plan on doing the research and identifying the right funder for your project, and partnering with others to collaborate and build relationships.
Abstract from Engine Orange: One way to get funding for all the technology you wish you had is to apply for grants. The process can be intimidating if you're new to it, but don't let that stop you! These experts, who have helped to grant financial wishes for many applicants, give you advice on how to find funding and how to apply for it.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Guevara, S. (2019, November). Solving the funding puzzle: A quick-start guide to library
funding resources. Computer in Libraries. 39(9), 14-19.
Explanation: Guevara lists a plethora of places to start to help guide you in the process of writing, funding, and securing donations. She lists a few websites with examples, reasoning for adding them into her article, and how they can help. Guevara adds in little bits and pieces to help guide the grant writer such as common grant types, grant terms, applications for one’s phone, and her most used resource: The Cybrarian’s Web2: An A-Z Guide to FREE Social Media Tools, Apps, and Other Resources.
Abstract from Engine Orange: The article offers several sites to learn more about grants and other funding opportunities and identify potential funding agencies and their priorities including GrantSpace provides users with an opportunity to access Foundation Center funding information locally; GuideStar will help you learn more about a specific nonprofit organization, charity, or foundation; and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the U.S.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Pon, S. (2018). Get that grant: Grant-writing can be intimidating to librarians who can’t afford
dedicated staff for the task. But the help and opportunity are out there. Library Journal.
143(21), 26-27.
Explanation: Pon starts off by explaining the funding trends from 2006-2016, and she breaks them up into subgroups that were funded: public, archives, academic, school, and digital collections. As the article continues, Pon informs the reader how the subgroups were funded, the amount of money they received, and useful tools to help you meet your goals. Pon included valuable websites, email alerts from digests and news services, and ways to write a perfect proposal.
Abstract from Engine Orange: The article offers information on grant-seeking for libraries. Topics discussed include questions that should be asked to help find the right funders, most important thing to remember about writing proposals, and free resources to start finding grant makers. Data on funding for libraries in the U.S. by library type from 2006-2016 is also presented.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “library” not “workshops”
Article:
Witteveen, A. (2019, November). Grant expectations: Get support to turn ideas into winning
            programs. School Library Journal. 65(10), 36-40.
Explanation: Witteveen explains the progression one should take when requesting a grant. Witeveen explains that one should not ask for “money” rather they should ask for “X” dollars, so that library funding sources understand your needs. One can identify both community partners as well as larger funding sources to obtain grants, and that one should always be sure to follow up with anyone you reach out to or provides the grant.
Abstract from Engine Orange: The article offers information on grants and other funding opportunities for librarians in the U.S. Topics include the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant application by children's outreach specialist Stephanie Knop through the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the renovation of the library at Harry S. Truman High School in Levittown, Pennsylvania through a Lowe's Toolbox for Education grant, and the availability of Best Buy's Community Grants to libraries. INSET: 5 GRANT WRITING TIPS.

Database Used: OCLC
Search Terms Used: (4) “grant writing”
Articles:
Surface, T. (2016, December 06). Getting a Million Dollar Digital Collection Grant in Six Easy
Steps. OCLC Next. Retrieved from oclc.org/blog/main/getting-a-million-dollar-digital
collection-grant-in-six-easy-steps.
Explanation: Surface explains six easy steps that lead the grant writer in the right direction of securing the funds. Alongside the steps, Surface explains how to relate your goals of your grant to the grant makers, such as supervisors and colleagues, by explaining the benefits of the program, the audience it will reach, the benefits to the overall community using a before and after approach, the measurements one will use for those benefits, what success will look like along the way, and what the next steps are to take the goal even further. Surface also includes extra resources on how to write a preliminary proposal, writing a grant proposal, and winning said proposal.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: (5) “grants” and “school library” and “makerspace”
Article:
Chao, T. (2016). Making goes districtwide. School Library Journal. 62(8), 14.
Explanation: The Education Foundation of Wauwatosa, EFW, offered a grant to the school district libraries of Wauwatosa, WI allowing the implementation of makerspaces. The grant consisted of $17,200, something quite unusual for such a district, and allowed students to benefit from the collaboration and socialization of common interests. The short article explains how the grant was started, the timeline in between, the items requested, and the end result. Because of this grant over 6,000 students were affected.
Abstract from Engine Orange: The article reports on the grant provided by nonprofit Education Foundation of Wauwatosa (EFW) to school district libraries in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin to create makerspaces. Particular focus is given to the fundraising strategies of EFW, as well as Longfellow Middle School's grant application. According to EFW President Mary Phillips, the makerspace project is a group type of creative thinking, strategy and processing.

Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange
Search Terms Used: “grants” and “school library” and “makerspace”
Article:
Lynch, G. H. (2018). Maker grows up. School Library Journal. 64(5), 36–40.
Explanation: Hubs comprised of libraries, school districts, and educators are able to discover the best way to utilize makerspaces, a community-operated workspace where people with common interests can collaborate. The article explains what makerspaces are, their establishment and progression through the decade, and the benefits individuals receive from them. CMP and Maker Ed supplied a $500,000 grant, supplied by Google, to fund the implementation of said makerspaces.
Abstract from Engine Orange: The article reports on the grant provided by nonprofit Education Foundation of Wauwatosa (EFW) to school district libraries in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin to create makerspaces. Particular focus is given to the fundraising strategies of EFW, as well as Longfellow Middle School's grant application. According to EFW President Mary Phillips, the makerspace project is a group type of creative thinking, strategy and processing.

Friday, April 24, 2020

Student Rec: A Series of Unfortunate Events

A Series of Unfortunate Events

The Ersatz Elevator

By: Lemony Snicket






Synopsis

The story starts out as just a normal family, but the farther you get into the book you start learning about each of the characters:
  • Mr. Poe – he is a very thoughtful and a very kind person because he looks after the Buadelaire orphans.
  • Baudelaire orphans – are all happy and they are great sisters and brother because they all stick together and stick up for each other.
  • Jerome – he is rich, and he leaves the orphans at home most of the time because of the way that they look and dress.
  • Count Olaf – was disguised as an auctioneer and imprisoned the Buadelaire orphans. 

The characters must go to this new place and walk up many stairs and finally they get to the top and go to the penthouse where Esme and Jerome Squalor are the rich people that take care of the orphans. The Squalor’s don’t like the way they dress because their clothes are cheap, and they don’t get the opportunities other kids get because they don’t have many toys and they don’t get to leave the penthouse that often. Jerome Squalor tried to avoid making contact with Esme because he didn’t want to make her madder at the Buadelaire orphans. Then at the end of the book the Buadelaire orphans want to figure out what V.F.D. means so they decide to work together and find out what it means. Gunther is the evil person behind it all and he doesn’t want the orphans to find out his real identity and plans. He is up to no good. The orphans leaned to rely on each other no matter what happened.

Review

            I enjoyed this book because once you start reading the book you don’t want to put the book down but it can be kind of frustrating when you get left on a cliff hanger and you can’t come back to the book for a while. I would recommend this book to a peer because I know some of us like cliff hangers and some of us like books that you can get pulled into and be in someone’s shoes in the book, but you may not like the book because you may feel like you are actually one of those kids in the book even if you’re an adult and you read it you can feel there pain of having to be one of those kids. You can read this book at any time also it would kind of be fun if you got some friends to read the book with you and you guys can be one of the characters in the book and switch off that’s what made the book fun for me to read it. My favorite part of the book was when the orphans all got to the penthouse and met their new parents.

Website      

This is a link to the authors website: https://www.lemonysnicket.com/

Other Books By The Author

  • A Series of unfortunate Events #1 The Bad Beginning
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events #2 The Reptile Room
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events #3 The Wide Window
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events #4 The Miserable Mill
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events #5 The Austere Academy
  • This author also has many other books that are not a part of the series.

This book series has also been made into a Netflix series you can find it on his website on Netflix.


Academic Articles for Grant Writing

Annotated Bibliography Academic Articles of Grant Writing Database Used: SHSU Newton Gresham Library’s Engine Orange Se...